Native Plant Database

Header Photo: Mervin Wallace

Golden Currant

Ribes odoratum
Plant Type: Shrubs
Native Environment: Cliff
Season of Interest: Early (Feb - Apr), Mid (May - June)
Main Color: Yellow
Fall Color: Yellow

USDA PLANTS Range Map

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Woody stems with green foliage and bright yellow flowers.
Photo: Mervin Wallace
Sun Exposure 
Full Sun, Medium Sun/Average Shade
Soil
Moisture
Dry, Moderate
Nature Attracting
Butterfly, Hummingbird, Pollinators/Beneficial Insects
Wildlife Benefit
Butterfly / Moth Host, Food/Pollinators
Animal
Resistance
Deer Resistant
Size

Height:

4 to
6
feet

Spread:

6 to
10
feet
Size
Height: 4 to
6
feet
Spread: 6 to
10
feet
Size
Height: 4 to
6
feet
Spread: 6 to
10
feet
Typical Landscape Use
Edible landscapes and wildlife habitat gardens, as well as informal shrub borders. Near a patio or other spot where the fragrance can be appreciated.
Establishment and Care Instructions
Alternate host for white pine blister rust, so consider other choices if white pines are near. Plant in well-drained soil, and a sunnier spot if available will encourage more flowering. Not self-fertile, so two genetically different plants are required for the plants to produce seeds.
Special Features
Ornamental Fruits / Seed Pods / Seed Heads
Special Usage
Edible, Fragrant, Privacy Screen, Salt Tolerant
Basic Description

Smaller shrub with open habit has trumpet-shaped spring flowers, yellow and having an assertive fragrance of cloves. Shiny hanging fruits ripen in summer from green to red then black and will be used as food by birds. The fruits are also edible for people, consumed raw or used similarly to gooseberries. The larger leaves look like maple leaves, turning from blue-green to yellow in fall if persisting after summer. Referenced in some sources as Ribes aureum var. villosum. Note: This resource on this edible plant is intended as general information only. As with any foods, there is a potential for allergic reactions when consuming native edibles. Always seek the advice of a health professional with any questions about touching or eating any plant matter.

Where Should I Start?

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Where Can I Find This Plant in Nature?

Learn about the Native Environment(s) inhabited by the plants in this database.

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