Native Plant Database

Header Photo: Mervin Wallace

Jack-in-the-pulpit

Arisaema triphyllum
Plant Type: Herbaceous Perennials
Native Environment: Forest
Season of Interest: Early (Feb - Apr), Mid (May - June), Late (July - frost)
Main Color: Green
Fall Color:

USDA PLANTS Range Map

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Plant with green flowering structure and green leaves.
Photo: Carol Davit.
Sun Exposure 
Medium Sun/Average Shade, Shade
Soil
Moisture
Moderate, High, Wet
Nature Attracting
Songbirds
Wildlife Benefit
Food/Birds
Animal
Resistance
Deer Resistant, Rabbit Resistant
Size

Height:

12 to
30
inches

Spread:

12 to
18
inches
Size
Height: 12 to
30
inches
Spread: 12 to
18
inches
Size
Height: 12 to
30
inches
Spread: 12 to
18
inches
Typical Landscape Use
Shady woodland gardens, rain gardens.
Establishment and Care Instructions
Grows best in fertile, medium to wet but well-drained soil, in part shade to full shade; dislikes heavy clay soils. Established plants will spread and can be divided when dormant. Seed-propagated plants will not flower until established.
Special Features
Ornamental Fruits / Seed Pods / Seed Heads
Special Usage
Rainscaping
Basic Description

Iconic forest plant with a distinctive namesake flowering structure that appears in April and May, consisting of an erect spike (called a “spadix”—the Jack) enclosed by a spathe, which also extends over the top like a hood (the pulpit). The spathe is often striped, usually green, and may also include shades of brown and purple. A blooming-sized plant has two leaves with long petioles, generally divided into three leaflets. Plants grow singly or in colonies, with most individuals dying back by midsummer although, under proper conditions, mature plants produce red berries available for wildlife to eat by late summer. Plant parts contain calcium oxalate, which is considered toxic to humans if ingested.

 

Jack-in-the-pulpit plant with green leaves and hooded striped flowers

Photo: Steve R. Turner (courtesy of missouriplants.com)

Where Should I Start?

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Where Can I Find This Plant in Nature?

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