Native Plant Database

Header Photo: Mervin Wallace

Persimmon

Diospyros virginiana
Plant Type: Trees
Native Environment: Forest
Season of Interest: Late (July - frost)
Main Color: Green
Fall Color: Orange, Yellow
Hardy From Zone: 1
Hardy To Zone: 1

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Hardiness Zones

Midwest map of zones 5 (north), 6, and 7 (south)

as defined by the USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map; (hardiness zones are not recorded for all Grow Native! plants)
Sun Exposure 
Full Sun
Soil
Moisture
Moderate
Nature Attracting
Wildlife Benefit
Food/Birds, Food/Small Animals, Nesting
Animal
Resistance
Size

Height:

35 to
60
feet

Spread:

20 to
35
feet
Size
Height: 35 to
60
feet
Spread: 20 to
35
feet
Size
Height: 35 to
60
feet
Spread: 20 to
35
feet
Typical Landscape Use
Plant in hedgerows and thickets and or as a grove for fruit.
Establishment and Care Instructions
Grows best in full sun in moist, well-drained soil but it will adapt to drier locations. May be difficult to transplant. Plant in spring as a small tree for best results. Needs two sexes to fruit.
Special Features
Interesting Bark
Special Usage
Edible
Basic Description

Medium-sized trees with distinctive, dark brown to black bark with rectangular blocks, similar to alligator hide. Male and female flowers appear in May to June on separate trees. October frosts signal the beginning of persimmon season. When ripe, persimmon fruits turn yellowish to pale orange and taste similar to apricots. Prior to ripening, the fruits have an astringent taste. Trees tend to sucker and form thickets but can be kept in check by mowing.

Where Should I Start?

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Where Can I Find This Plant in Nature?

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