Native Plant Database

Header Photo: Mervin Wallace

Pin Oak

Quercus palustris
Plant Type: Trees
Native Environment: Forest
Season of Interest: Mid (May - June), Late (July - frost), Winter (Nov - Mar)
Main Color: Green
Fall Color: Red

USDA PLANTS Range Map

At the range map link above, zoom in for county-level data

Sun Exposure 
Full Sun, Medium Sun/Average Shade
Soil
Moisture
Moderate, High
Nature Attracting
Pollinators/Beneficial Insects
Wildlife Benefit
Butterfly / Moth Host, Food/Birds, Food/Small Animals, Nesting
Animal
Resistance
Size

Height:

60 to
70
feet

Spread:

25 to
40
feet
Size
Height: 60 to
70
feet
Spread: 25 to
40
feet
Size
Height: 60 to
70
feet
Spread: 25 to
40
feet
Typical Landscape Use
Many animals including deer, fox, raccoon, quail and wild turkey depend on the acorns. Good for bird nesting sites. Good as a specimen tree in large areas and in low lying areas.
Establishment and Care Instructions
Prefers moist, rich, well-drained soil. Will tolerate clay soil and standing water for a short period. Iron chlorosis may develop in highly alkaline soil.
Special Features
Special Usage
Salt Tolerant
Basic Description

Strongly pyramidal tree with pendulous lower branches. Glossy dark green leaves change to bronze or red in the fall. Dried, brown leaves remain on tree for much of the winter. Light brown acorns form in the fall and provide food for a wide range of animals. Also provides food for red-banded hairstreak butterfly caterpillars, which feed on decaying sumac leaves and oak litter.

Oak species, as a group, serve as host plants for caterpillars of more than 500 different kinds of butterflies and moths. This is more than any other genus of tree. The caterpillars (larvae) feed on foliage, but without harming the trees. Oaks are vitally important in supporting nature’s web of life.

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Where Can I Find This Plant in Nature?

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